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February 2003

January 4th, 2011 0

.38 Bullets & Cases?

Q. I want to know if a plated bullet can be driven as fast as a jacketed bullet (like a Speer .38). Also is a .38 Special case the same as a .38 +P case of the same make?

Warren Evert
Lake Havasu City, AZ

A. I’ve shot plated bullets in my .38 Super as fast as jacketed bullets with no adverse affects that I could tell. Some pistols shoot well with them and others like jacketed bullets better; that’s why we experiment with different loads to see what each firearm shoots best. You could check the water capacity of the cases and if the +P case holds less, then the case walls would be thicker than a standard case.

Mike Watkins
Brownells

If you would like any of the experts on our panel to answer your question, mark it to their attention and send it to Ask The Experts, Shooting Times, P.O. Box 1790, Peoria, IL 61656. Individual responses cannot be made, but questions of general interest may be published.

What Powder For .308 & .30-30?

Q. I am looking for one powder that I can use for loading both .30-30 and .308 Winchester calibers, primarily with 170- and 150-grain bullets in the same order. I have narrowed the search to these: Reloder 15, BLC-2, W748, H4895, and IMR-3031. Which one does Mike Venturino recommend?

D. Clarke
Fort Madison, IA

A. While loading data exists for all the powders you asked about, I’ve settled on IMR-3031 for most all of my .308 Winchester and .30-30 jacketed bullet reloading. For me, it burns cleanly and gives fine accuracy. I admit that it does not powder measure as well as some other smokeless powders, but since I don’t need large quantities of either of those cartridges I don’t mind spending a little extra time with a powder trickler getting precise charges.

Mike Venturino

If you would like any of the experts on our panel to answer your question, mark it to their attention and send it to Ask The Experts, Shooting Times, P.O. Box 1790, Peoria, IL 61656. Individual responses cannot be made, but questions of general interest may be published.

What Cartridge Is My Model 70 Chambered For?

Q. I have a Winchester Model 70 that is marked .22 Hornet. After trying several cartridges in the chamber, it seems to have been rechambered to cartridge a little larger than the Hornet. What cartridge is it chambered for?

Jack Long
Kansas City, KS

A. It is almost impossible to tell the cartridge without chamber casting your barrel. I would recommend having a gunsmith do this for you. If I were to take a guess, you should find the chambering to be either the .22-3000 or R2 Lovell. These were very popular chamberings 50 years ago and many rifles were rechambered for them. Several years ago I printed a book on the .22-3000 Lovell cartridge and have some left that I would like to get out of storage. I’ll send you a copy.

Terry Kopp
Terry Kopp Gunsmithing

If you would like any of the experts on our panel to answer your question, mark it to their attention and send it to Ask The Experts, Shooting Times, P.O. Box 1790, Peoria, IL 61656. Individual responses cannot be made, but questions of general interest may be published.

Can Raindrops Deflect A Bullet?

Q. During the last deer season I took a sure shot at a deer walking broadside at only 75 yards. I was shooting a .25-06 with Winchester’s 115-grain Ballistic Silvertip. The scope crosshairs were steady right behind the shoulder for a double lung shot. At the shot, this deer and the one with it quickly got behind a line of woods where it was too thick to try a second shot. Both walked quickly but neither ran as I watched them finally disappear about 30 seconds later. I searched for blood even though the deer appeared never to be hit. No blood was found. There were no twigs or branches that seemed in line with the shot. It was raining light to moderate at the time, and I wonder if the 3000 fps bullet hitting a lot of raindrops on the way to its target could have been significantly deflected. The scope was right on because I dropped the same deer at just 60 yards a week later.

Rick Post
Wytheville, VA

A. Your question is interesting, and as it turns out, beyond the realm of all but those schooled in physics or external ballistics. To arrive at any sort of conclusion eventually required the assistance of a college physics professor. As it was explained to us, when two bodies in motion meet, their individual paths are altered, in regard to both direction and speed. How much deviation occurs, depends on the relative weights of the bodies and their speeds. The heavier/faster body would be deflected less than the lighter/slower body. A good example would be a bug hitting the windshield of a moving car. The effect on the car is pretty insignificant, while the effect on the bug is devastating, to say the least. While a raindrop and a speeding bullet do not compare to the energy of a moving automobile, the comparison is useful. The weight and speed of a water droplet is comparatively insignificant to a 115-grain projectile at 3000 feet per second.

There is another theory that casts doubt on whether it is likely that a raindrop would ever actually make contact with the bullet in flight. Just as many bugs do not make contact with the windshield of the moving car when they get caught in the car’s “slip-stream,” there exists a similar slipstream surrounding the moving projectile that, in theory at least, could keep raindrops at a distance.

An associate tells of shooting slow-fire at Camp Perry in a driving rainstorm with a .30-caliber service rifle. The only limiting factor caused by the rain had to do with visibility. While he wasn’t particularly proud of the results, at 200 yards, and under less than ideal circumstances, he was still able to keep all his shots in the black.

John Treakle
Midway USA

If you would like any of the experts on our panel to answer your question, mark it to their attention and send it to Ask The Experts, Shooting Times, P.O. Box 1790, Peoria, IL 61656. Individual responses cannot be made, but questions of general interest may be published.

Does High Temperature Affect Ammunition?

Q. I live where the outside temperature reaches 110 to 115 degrees Fahrenheit–and it’s anyone’s guess on the inside of a parked car. I am concerned about how that heat affects the ammunition in a self-defense car gun. Is there any danger of a round discharging due t
o the extreme heat? If not, would the heat degrade the powder in a cartridge?

Name And Address
Withheld By Request

A. I, too, live in an area that is known for high temperatures and have never had any trouble with the ammo in my car gun. It would take a much hotter temperature to set off a modern cartridge. Still, I leave my window cracked, just a bit, whenever possible and change ammunition regularly. It would be a good idea to switch to fresh ammo at least twice during the summer months and use the old ammo for practice only.

Sheriff Jim Wilson

If you would like any of the experts on our panel to answer your question, mark it to their attention and send it to Ask The Experts, Shooting Times, P.O. Box 1790, Peoria, IL 61656. Individual responses cannot be made, but questions of general interest may be published.

Info About Beretta Model 948?

Q. My question concerns a small pistol my wife gave me for Christmas way back in the mid-1950s. I can’t find this pistol listed in any book on guns that I own. It is a Model 948 Beretta, .22 caliber. “P. Beretta-Gardone V.T.-cal 22 LR-Mod 948″ is stamped on the left side of the slide. The frame is stamped with what appears to be proof marks and “PSF 1955.” The right side has “Made in Italy” stamped on the frame along with the serial number 058869N. What can you tell me about my pistol?

Kenneth Marchant
Cowley, WY

A. The Beretta Model 948 is a 22 Long Rifle version of the Beretta Model 1934. It was produced in the mid-’50s as a modification of the 1934 model and sold by J.L. Galef as the “Plinker” or “Featherweight” as it has an aluminum frame. The Model 1934 was Italy’s service pistol in World War II and is considered one of Italy’s best service pistols. The Model 948 was offered with a 3.5- or six-inch barrel and has the reputation of being very reliable and well made. Beretta’s proven design was maintained but made several changes such as a push-button magazine release, wraparound grips, and further use of alloys and called it the Model 70 Puma or Cougar. These improved models were offered in .32 ACP, .380 ACP, and several versions in .22 LR.

Floyd Wine
MidwayUSA

If you would like any of the experts on our panel to answer your question, mark it to their attention and send it to Ask The Experts, Shooting Times, P.O. Box 1790, Peoria, IL 61656. Individual responses cannot be made, but questions of general interest may be published.

What’s The Right Sight-In Distance?

Q. I recently purchased a Smith & Wesson Model 629-5 with a three-inch barrel. I intend to use it for self-defense, backwoods protection, and some defensive shooting competition. At what distance should I sight it in?

T. Hinkle
Smiths Grove, KY

A. It’s a good practice to sight-in your short-barreled .44 to shoot dead on at 25 yards with a specific load. However, I would also test it at shorter and longer distances to see where it is hitting at those ranges too.

Sheriff Jim Wilson

If you would like any of the experts on our panel to answer your question, mark it to their attention and send it to Ask The Experts, Shooting Times, P.O. Box 1790, Peoria, IL 61656. Individual responses cannot be made, but questions of general interest may be published.

Who Made My Ranger .22?

Q. I bought a pump-action .22 rifle at an estate sale and can’t find any information about it in any of my firearms reference books. It is 41 inches overall, weighs six pounds, and has a metal buttplate. It is marked for 22 S, L, LR on the left side of the barrel, and on the left side of the receiver is the word “Ranger.” Can you tell me what gun I have and its approximate value?

Gene B. Tuttle Jr.
Plano, TX

A. None of the cross-reference material I have lists the “Ranger” brand rifle you’ve managed to pick up. From the photos you included, though, it sure looks like a Savage Model 29, which was produced from 1929 through 1967. Ranger was a brand name used by Sears on some of its firearms, and quite a few guns sold by Sears over the years were made by Savage Arms.

David Kaiser
Brownells

If you would like any of the experts on our panel to answer your question, mark it to their attention and send it to Ask The Experts, Shooting Times, P.O. Box 1790, Peoria, IL 61656. Individual responses cannot be made, but questions of general interest may be published.

Any Information On A Pistol And Shotgun?

Q. I’m seeking information on two firearms. Firearm No. 1: No manufacturer’s name; Model 213; 9x19mm; KSI, Pomona, CA.; Made In China; stars on black plastic grips; serial number 39000292. Firearm No. 2: Interchangeable on right side of lock; Occidental on left side of lock; double barrel side-by-side exposed hammer; 12 gauge; Laminated Figure Belgium on scrolled rib. What can you tell me about these guns?

Bob Hendrick
Dewey, AZ

A. Your Model 213 9x19mm pistol is one of many Chinese copies of the Russian Makarov pistol imported into the U.S. These are not considered to be particularly desirable handguns and often sell for about $100 or so. As for your shotgun, while I do not have any specific information on it, I believe it is one of the many lower-grade double-barrel shotguns imported into the U.S. during the latter part of the 19th century. These guns, like yours, were primarily produced in Belgium. They were marketed through various importers and distributors including such outfits as Sears. These were lower priced guns that were quite popular with rural families of modest means. These guns have very little collector’s value if any. At most, I doubt this gun even in very good condition would sell for much more than $150.

Reid Coffield
Brownells

If you would like any of the experts on our panel to answer your question, mark it to their attention and send it to Ask The Experts, Shooting Times, P.O. Box 1790, Peoria, IL 61656. Individual responses cannot be made, but questions of general interest may be published.

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