Skip to main content

Ruger's Original Security Series

Ruger's Original Security Series

Ruger's original Security Series hand-guns were six-shot .357 Magnum double-action revolvers in blued steel and satin stainless steel. They put Ruger on the map in terms of duty guns. 

The .357 Mag. Security-Six double-action service revolver was one of the all-time great handguns. It was accurate, ergonomic, rugged, and dependable. When Bill Ruger introduced it in 1971, he wanted to offer the shooting world a top-quality double-action .357 Mag. at a low price. With an introductory retail price of $89 for the fixed-sight version and $97.50 for the adjustable-sight gun, the Security-Six was all that. 

The Security-Six was offered in two basic models: one with an adjustable rear sight and one with fixed sights. The fixed-sight version came to be known as the Speed-Six. Both versions were offered in blued steel and stainless steel. The barrel was medium weight and available in 2.75-, 4.0-, and 6.0-inch lengths. Some special 3.0-inch-barreled guns were offered on a limited basis, and some revolvers were chambered for 9mm Luger. There was also a version called the Service-Six. Late in the "150-" serial number prefix range, the grip frame of the Security-Six was changed to a "highback" shape. After that, revolvers with "highback" grip frames, fixed sights, and square butts were marked "Service-Six." Prior to that change, all "lowback" revolvers were marked "Security-Six" regardless of the type of sights. 

One of the innovative features of the Security-Six was that it did not have the sideplate that most other double-action revolvers had. Instead, the revolver disassembled by removing the grip screw, and then the grips, the lockwork, and the cylinder assembly could be removed. 


The frame, crane, hammer, trigger, trigger guard, and other smaller parts were produced from investment castings. The barrel was a machined forging, and the cylinder was machined from bar stock. All springs were coil type. 


The ejector rod housing and a raised, grooved barrel rib were integral with the barrel. And a Baughman-style quick-draw front sight was pinned to the rib.

The gun utilized a transfer bar firing mechanism, and the cylinder rotated counterclockwise when the action was operated. When the thumbpiece was pushed in, the cylinder swung out to the left. Cylinder capacity was six rounds. 

I've always liked the wording Ruger used to describe the Security-Six, especially this quotation: "It [the Security-Six] is a handsome, rugged holster revolver- compact in the overall, yet massive enough to properly be designated as a heavy-duty revolver for the rigors of police and military service."

As good as the revolver was, it was not without critics. The chief complaints were that it was muzzle light and that the back of the grip frame had an uncomfortable hump that tended to make the revolver roll in the shooter's hand. Ruger addressed those concerns when the Security-Six was replaced by the GP100 in the late 1980s. Even so, the Security-Six was very popular, with approximately 1.5 million produced during the 17 years it was in production.


 
 

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Recommended Articles

See More Recommendations

Popular Videos

Black Hills Evolution of Rifle Cartridge: .308 Win. 175 Gr. Match

Black Hills Evolution of Rifle Cartridge: .308 Win. 175 Gr. Match

David Fortier talks with Jeff Hoffman of Black Hills Ammunition about the evolution of the .308 Win. 175 Gr. Match bullet.

All About .300 Blackout

All About .300 Blackout

The .300 Blackout is here to stay, and we take some time to look at new technology surrounding this cartridge. Next, we pit subsonic rivals against each other before stretching the legs of this CQB round out to 600 yards from a short 9-inch barrel.

The Glock 21

The Glock 21

Frank and Tony from Gallery of Guns spice up the Glock test using their non-dominant hands.

Tactical Solutions Introduces New X-Ring Takedown SBR Rifle

Tactical Solutions Introduces New X-Ring Takedown SBR Rifle

Keith Feeley of Tactical Solutions sat down with Michael Bane at SHOT Show 2018 to talk about the new X-Ring Takedown SBR .22LR rifle.

See More Popular Videos

Trending Articles

The new Winchester Active Duty 9mm ammo is loaded to the same military ballistics specifications as for the MHS program and has a rated muzzle velocity of 1,320 fps and a muzzle energy of 445 ft-lbs.Winchester Active Duty 9mm Ammo Review Ammo

Winchester Active Duty 9mm Ammo Review

Jake Edmondson - July 17, 2020

The new Winchester Active Duty 9mm ammo is loaded to the same military ballistics...

With a 16.25-inch-long barrel, a tritium front sight and an aperture rear sight, Springfield's M1A Tanker chambered in .308 is a handy defensive carbine.Springfield Armory M1A Tanker .308 Review Rifles

Springfield Armory M1A Tanker .308 Review

Joel J. Hutchcroft - August 25, 2020

With a 16.25-inch-long barrel, a tritium front sight and an aperture rear sight, Springfield's...

While the 6mm-caliber cartridges that can be considered “great” are few in number, some have long and storied histories.12 Great 6mm Cartridges Ammo

12 Great 6mm Cartridges

Steve Gash - August 20, 2020

While the 6mm-caliber cartridges that can be considered “great” are few in number, some have...

A half-century in the making, the new DGX Bonded is Hornady's best-ever dangerous-game bullet.Danger Tamed: Hornady DGX Bonded Hunting Ammo Ammo

Danger Tamed: Hornady DGX Bonded Hunting Ammo

Joseph von Benedikt - May 23, 2019

A half-century in the making, the new DGX Bonded is Hornady's best-ever dangerous-game bullet.

See More Trending Articles

More Handguns

The craftsmen at Nighthawk Custom build some of the most precise Model 1911s available, and the Fire Hawk is a perfect specimen.Nighthawk Custom Fire Hawk Model 1911 Review Handguns

Nighthawk Custom Fire Hawk Model 1911 Review

Layne Simpson - May 01, 2020

The craftsmen at Nighthawk Custom build some of the most precise Model 1911s available, and...

Just by looking at the Kimber Rapide 1911, you can tell it is built for speed. It has all the bells and whistles that a hot-rod 1911 needs for fast function, and its fit and finish are superb.Kimber Rapide 1911 Review Handguns

Kimber Rapide 1911 Review

Joseph von Benedikt - June 29, 2020

Just by looking at the Kimber Rapide 1911, you can tell it is built for speed. It has all the...

The painful part about Brian Lohman Manufacturing's new YMIR Model 1911 is that it carries a retail price of $6,999. Not many of us can afford to pay that much for a pistol, but if you think of this gun as being a piece of art, one that you can actually use and then pass down to an heir, then maybe the sting of its price is tolerable.Lohman YMIR 1911 Review Handguns

Lohman YMIR 1911 Review

Joel J. Hutchcroft - June 16, 2020

The painful part about Brian Lohman Manufacturing's new YMIR Model 1911 is that it carries a...

The Springfield Hellcat is also available in the OSP (Optical Sight Pistol) version, which has the same open sights as the standard model but a 0.190-inch-deep mortise machined into the top of the slide is a snug fit for a micro red-dot sight. It comes with a removable steel plate that fills the mortise, giving the user the option of using the gun with or without a red-dot sight. Embedding the optic allows the open sights to be viewed without having to make them uncommonly tall.Springfield Hellcat OSP Review Handguns

Springfield Hellcat OSP Review

Layne Simpson - June 18, 2020

The Springfield Hellcat is also available in the OSP (Optical Sight Pistol) version, which has...

See More Handguns

Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Digital Now Included!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE Arrow

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Phone Icon

Get Digital Access.

All Shooting Times subscribers now have digital access to their magazine content. This means you have the option to read your magazine on most popular phones and tablets.

To get started, click the link below to visit mymagnow.com and learn how to access your digital magazine.

Get Digital Access

Not a Subscriber?
Subscribe Now