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Dan Wesson Revolvers Return

by G&A Staff   |  January 3rd, 2011 25

CZ-USA has launched a major reintroduction of the Dan Wesson revolver line, beginning with its most classic configurations.


CZ-USA President Alice Poluchova (T) and the author put new Dan Wesson revolvers in .445 SuperMag and .357 Mag. to an exclusive field test in the Kalahari Desert in South Africa.

Way back in the 1980s Dan Wesson Arms produced some of the finest, most accurate, and popular large- and medium-frame revolvers ever made in America. In the demanding sport of handgun metallic shooting–where competitors are required to use open sights to knock down life-size, heavy steel (up to 60 pounds) representations of chickens, pigs, turkeys, and desert bighorns out to 200 meters–Dan Wesson revolvers literally owned the ranges.

Dan Wesson revolvers regularly captured 70 to 80 percent of the top places in the highest categories of these competitions year after year at local, state, regional, and national matches and at the annual International Championships. Dan Wesson revolvers still hold more records and titles in that sport than all other makes of revolvers combined.

Despite this record of success, however, Dan Wesson was a small company as compared to other famous-name handgun makers, and during the 1990s it fell on hard times. It went through a series of largely unsuccessful financial reorganizations and ownership changes with relocations of factories and erratic production, and it fell pretty much off the firearms industry radar except for die-hard long-range revolver fans. That’s about to change.

Last winter the Dan Wesson Firearms Co. was purchased lock, stock, and barrel by CZ-USA (Dept. ST, 3327 N. 7th St., Kansas City, KS 66115; 800-955-4486; www.cz-usa.com), the international powerhouse purveyor of some of the world’s finest hunting rifles and shotguns and the classic CZ75 pistol design. Beginning this year, CZ is launching a major reintroduction of the Dan Wesson revolver line, beginning with its most classic configurations and chamberings.

The new offerings include the Model 7445 Alaskan Guide Special, with four-inch compensated barrel and matte black “Yukon Coat” stainless-steel finish; the Model 7445 Tactical Revolver, with four-inch barrel and tactical accessories rail; the Model 7445 VH8, with eight-inch barrel, adjustable sights, and scope mount base; the Model 7445 VH8 Safari with special presentation case and both rubber and rosewood grips; and the Pistol Pack with four-, six-, and eight-inch barrels and English-style presentation case.

I’ve been a fan of the Dan Wesson revolver design for many years. I was privileged to know company founder Dan Wesson, as well as his family, and had the opportunity to consult in the development of several classic Dan Wesson models and chamberings. In November 1980 the company sent me the very first preproduction version of the .44 Magnum Dan Wesson Model 44 in a “Pistol Pac” with six- and eight-inch barrels.


DAN WESSON REVOLVER SPECS
MODEL: 7445 Alaskan Guide Special 7445 Tactical Revolver 7445 VH8 7445 VH8 Safari Pistol Pack
OPERATION DA DA DA DA DA
CALIBER: .445 SuperMag .445 SuperMag .445 SuperMag .445 SuperMag Various Dan Wesson chamberings
BARREL LENGTH: 4 inches 4 inches 8 inches 8 inches 4. 6. 8 inches
SIGHTS: Adj. white-outline rear; inter-
changeable front
Adj. white-outline rear; inter-
changeable front
Adj. white-outline rear; inter-
changeable front
Adj. white-outline rear; inter-
changeable front
Adj. white-outline rear; inter-
changeable front
STOCKS: Rubber Rubber Hardwood Hardwood Rubber; rosewood
CYLINDER CAPACITY: 6 rounds 6 rounds 6 rounds 6 rounds 6 rounds
FINISH: Matte black “Yukon Coat” stainless steel Matte black “Yukon Coat” stainless steel Polished stainless Polished stainless Polished stainless
PRICE: $1295 $1395 $1070 $1795 NA
NOTE: All Dan Wesson revolvers feature the interchangeable barrel system

On a cold, wet, miserably dreary day I took it out and proceeded to shoot a 1.12-inch five-shot group at 50 meters from the eight-inch VH barrel
with open sights from a sandbag rest using S&W 240-grain JHP ammo (no longer manufactured). That would be a good result even with a scoped single-shot pistol.

Why does this system give Dan Wesson revolvers an accuracy edge? All firearm barrels flex, whip, and vibrate as bullets pass down their bores in discharge. Conventional revolver barrels attach only the breech end of the barrel to the receiver or frame; the other end is left hanging.


(Top) Original Dan Wesson Model 445 V10 (Circa 1988) (Bottom) New CZ-USA Dan Wesson Model 7445 VH8 (Circa 2005)

It doesn’t matter how big, fat, and heavy the forward portion of the barrel may be; the only secure point is the thin-diameter threaded part that screws into the frame. By contrast, the straight, tubular Dan Wesson barrel is held in place at both ends–screwed into the frame at the breech and locked at the muzzle by the enclosing shroud and barrel nut.

The result is a more secure foundation, less barrel vibration, and less variation in the flexing of the barrel from round to round. The result, at the longer ranges where it shows and where it matters, is superior accuracy and superior ability to withstand continuous heavy-load stress.

There are other Dan Wesson design features that the company’s technical staff say contribute to their guns’ accuracy and endurance. One is the width of the barrel/cylinder gap, which can be carefully and precisely controlled–and altered–by carefully screwing the barrel in or out until optimal performance is reached. Another factor is the cylinder/crane assembly that locks shut to the frame by a latch in the crane itself–as opposed to a latch at the rear of the cylinder alone (like Colt) or at the rear of the cylinder and the front of the ejector rod (like a typical S&W).

The benefit of the crane-latch system (pioneered by the S&W Triple Lock .44 Special revolvers at the beginning of the century and then abandoned by that firm) is that it holds the crane tightly against the frame in firing. Systems that latch the crane only at the rear or in conjunction with the tip of the ejector rod allow the crane to move slightly away from the frame under stress.

This results in variations in chamber alignment with the bore at the moment of truth and loss of consistency in round-to-round accuracy. Sustained use of such latching mechanisms merely increases the amount of play and slop in their system.

Still other important ingredients in the accuracy and durability of the Dan Wesson system include the use of a one-piece sideplate-free frame and modular construction on all large-frame big-bore magnum models, broached rifling for more crisp edges to the lands and grooves for better “bite” on the bullet, and “choke bored” barrels.

A choke-bored barrel is slightly larger in actual bore diameter at the breech than at the muzzle. This results in an increasingly tight bullet engagement with the rifling as it moves toward the muzzle. By deliberately choke-boring barrels, a manufacturer ensures that a barrel bore will not actually wind up being a little bit bigger at the muzzle than the breech. If it were, the barrel would be “looser” around the bullet the farther along it moved, and rifling stabilization would diminish.

Why does this system give Dan Wesson revolvers an accuracy edge? All firearm barrels flex, whip, and vibrate as bullets pass down their bores in discharge. Conventional revolver barrels attach only the breech end of the barrel to the receiver or frame; the other end is left hanging.

It doesn’t matter how big, fat, and heavy the forward portion of the barrel may be; the only secure point is the thin-diameter threaded part that screws into the frame. By contrast, the straight, tubular Dan Wesson barrel is held in place at both ends–screwed into the frame at the breech and locked at the muzzle by the enclosing shroud and barrel nut.

The result is a more secure foundation, less barrel vibration, and less variation in the flexing of the barrel from round to round. The result, at the longer ranges where it shows and where it matters, is superior accuracy and superior ability to withstand continuous heavy-load stress.

There are other Dan Wesson design features that the company’s technical staff say contribute to their guns’ accuracy and endurance. One is the width of the barrel/cylinder gap, which can be carefully and precisely controlled–and altered–by carefully screwing the barrel in or out until optimal performance is reached. Another factor is the cylinder/crane assembly that locks shut to the frame by a latch in the crane itself–as opposed to a latch at the rear of the cylinder alone (like Colt) or at the rear of the cylinder and the front of the ejector rod (like a typical S&W).

The benefit of the crane-latch system (pioneered by the S&W Triple Lock .44 Special revolvers at the beginning of the century and then abandoned by that firm) is that it holds the crane tightly against the frame in firing. Systems that latch the crane only at the rear or in conjunction with the tip of the ejector rod allow the crane to move slightly away from the frame under stress.

This results in variations in chamber alignment with the bore at the moment of truth and loss of consistency in round-to-round accuracy. Sustained use of such latching mechanisms merely increases the amount of play and slop in their system.

Still other important ingredients in the accuracy and durability of the Dan Wesson system include the use of a one-piece sideplate-free frame and modular construction on all large-frame big-bore magnum models, broached rifling for more crisp edges to the lands and grooves for better “bite” on the bullet, and “choke bored” barrels.

A choke-bored barrel is slightly larger in actual bore diameter at the breech than at the muzzle. This results in an increasingly tight bullet engagement with the rifling as it moves toward the muzzle. By deliberately choke-boring barrels, a manufacturer ensures that a barrel bore will not actually wind up being a little bit bigger at the muzzle than the breech. If it were, the barrel would be “looser” around the bullet the farther along it moved, and rifling stabilization would diminish.

None of these individual features–save the screw-in barrel system–are unique to Dan Wesson revolvers. Other companies have broached rifling and choke-bored barrels. Other companies utilize sideplate-free, solid-frame modular construction. Other companies’ revolvers latch their cylinder assemblies at the crane (Ruger’s Redhawk and GP-100 Series revolvers are noteworthy examples).


new revolvers from CZ
will be chambered initially for .445 SuperMag and will feature the interchangeable barrel system and cylinder/crane lockup of the original Dan Wesson design.

But no manufacturer other than Dan Wesson has combined all these modern and innovative design elements into one refined revolver package, and the results are obvious. No other revolver manufacturer offers the same level of overall performance confidence with an average store-bought, off-the-shelf, regular-production gun.

With the performance comes the versatility, which is also a basic result of the interchangeable-barrel system. Think about it: one gun with as many different barrel lengths and styles as you care to put on it. If you want a multipurpose fixed-barrel revolver, you have no choice but to compromise.

If your uses are weighted toward the short side, you have to get a four-incher; if your uses are weighted toward the long side, a six-incher. Barrels that are shorter or longer than those two are special-purpose only and not for “general use.” But with a Dan Wesson, you can get one gun and as many different specific-purpose barrel lengths as you need. No compromises or tradeoff choices are necessary. Depending on the caliber you select, available Dan Wesson barrel lengths have run from 21/2 inches to 15 inches.

The range of Dan Wesson calibers has included blued “carbon” (chrome-moly) steel and stainless-steel models in .22 Long Rifle, .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire, .32 H&R Magnum, .38 Special, and .357 Magnum, all in a medium-size format with sideplated frame. The large-size, solid-frame model list has included blued and stainless versions in .41 Magnum, .44 Magnum, .45 Colt, .357 SuperMag, and, at the upper reaches of revolver power, the .375 SuperMag and .445 SuperMag (0.3 inch longer than a standard .44 Magnum case). From plinking and small-game cartridges through law enforcement and defense to serious competition shooting to the biggest of handgun big-game loads, not much is missing.

Plus, there is a variety of shroud styles for nearly every barrel length. The standard (S) shroud has a short underlug ejector-rod housing and a solid top rib. The vented (V) shroud has the same profile as the standard shroud but features a vented top rib. The vent-heavy (VH) shroud has a vented top rib and a solid steel full-length underlug. These interchangeable shrouds allow you to easily use and switch different sight systems on the same barrel.

With one six-inch V shroud you might use standard metallic sights and then set up a different six-inch VH shroud with an Aimpoint electronic sight for action-shooting competition. Or set up an eight-inch or 10-inch shroud with a 1.5-4X or 2-7X variable-power scope for hunting and keep an open-sighted eight-inch shroud handy for other purposes.

The front sight blades on all the shrouds are also interchangeable. Red-insert ramp style is standard, but you can get yellow or a plain black Patridge-type competition blade.

And grip styles are interchangeable, too. Yes, I know that grips are interchangeable on nearly all handguns, but Dan Wesson goes a little further than most. On most traditional-form fixed-barrel revolvers from other manufacturers, a “full-profile” grip frame is used. That is, the grip frame is itself the size of the full outline of a standard-type grip, which consists of two panels or a two-piece wraparound unit. This limits the size and shape of the grips themselves. Square butts are square butts, round butts are round butts, and there is very little versatility.


The new revolvers performed as well as Dick’s original Dan Wesson in the African hunting fields. Irlene Mandrell (L) dropped a trophy springbok with one shot from the new .357 Mag. revolver, and Dick took this warthog with his vintage .445 SuperMag gun.

On Dan Wesson revolvers, the “grip frame” is a small stud protruding down from the rear of the frame body with a single threaded grip attachment at its base. It allows for nearly unlimited versatility in size and shape of grip configuration. And that makes a lot of sense when you realize that the same basic Dan Wesson .357 Magnum revolver frame might be used one day for deer hunting with a scoped 10-inch VH barrel and used the next day with a 21/2-inch barrel for police duty.

With the wood and rubber accessory grips that Dan Wesson offers, you can equip those setups with an oversize two-hand unit for the heavy scoped version and switch to a sleek little roundbutt service style for the short-barreled form. Is there a Dan Wesson setup that will suit your particular handgunning purposes? I’d be surprised if there weren’t.

The Old & The New Compared
In Africa the first thing we did was sit down at the Professional Hunter’s outdoor range and do a side-by-side session with my tried-and-true Model 445S and the new version Model 445S that Poluchova had brought along. We used 240-grain JHP and 300-grain JSP .445 SuperMag ammunition that CZ is having commercially loaded and marketed under the Dan Wesson label, as no mainstream ammomakers as yet offer it.

With 4X scope settings, both revolvers shot about 1.5 inches at 100 yards. No difference I could see at all between the old gun and the new gun–except that mine was two inches longer and had a slightly crisper, personally tuned, trigger pull than Poluchova’s current eight-inch, heavy shroud version.

Using the 240-grain ammo I used her gun to evening-stalk a trophy-grade (but nonetheless diminutive) Steenbok antelope to about 75 yards and shot it chest-on, for full penetration and exit out the hip. It went down in place–performance like you’d expect from a 20-percent more energetic .44 Magnum-caliber load. The next day I also shot a small warthog that had gotten on the wrong side of a farmer’s fence, using my own .445

SuperMag (I couldn’t resist the nostalgic appeal). At 125 yards broadside, he went flat from the full-penetrating impact. Two days later Irlene Mandrell, CZ’s celebrity spokesperson, dropped a trophy springbok at about 150 yards with one shot using a scoped Dan Wesson .357 Magnum.

I am delighted that the great Dan Wesson revolver design will be reentering the mainstream. The CZ-USA people are all serious hunters and shooters and are committed to putting this superb tool back in front of serious handgunners. I’m particularly happy that one of the initial models on the resurrection list is the Alaskan Guide version of the stainless Model 445: a four-inch, compensated version with Hogue grips and a matte black finish, designed as a dangerous-game companion sidearm for wilderness security. Dig up some previous Dan Wesson catalogs and see if there’s a chambering or a configuration that interests you. Then let the folks at CZ-USA know. They can make just about anything if there’s customer interest.

  • David Carver

    I remember back in the 80`s, I owned Dan Wesson 357`s and one supermag. The ONLY complaint I ever had with any of them were the slideup grips. They could easily be overtightened and ruined. Other than that, I loved those guns. The 357 package should go big now , with a 2,4, and 6" config. Beautiful design and the guns just felt good in the hand. Dan Wesson made some really fine pistols and if these new models are the same, They will succeed admirably.

  • Don Endicott

    I own 2 Dan Wesson revolvers, one is a .357 mag. pistol pac that I bought new over thirty years ago and the other is a .44 mag. 8 in. that is at least 20 yrs old. These are my favorite handguns in my collection. The .44 is my wife's favorite gun to shoot. If I ever get to where I can no longer shoot , my Dan Wessons will be my last guns to get rid of. I would like to have even more models in many callibers.

  • 4140

    cz-usa please bring back the 414 supermag as well i,ve been wanting one every since dan wesson co. started to bring it back in early 2000, then suddenly they they winked out again just before you took over i dont care about the 357 maximum/supermag, 375supermag or 445supermag and will not be satisfied with anything but the 414supermag it would millions of people the trouble of buying a 357 maximum just so to have it rechambered to 414 caliber and it would be a lot cheaper and safer as well please bring back the 414

  • 4140

    ruger maximums and seville/elderado supermags are almost impossible to find anymore havent seen any in years i would like to see the dan wesson supermags made in the super strong 17-4ph at least the cylinders then they would match the strength of the freedom arms 83 because the freedom arms 83 in 357, 41, and 44 magnums can surpass their 357 supermag,414 supermag, and 445 supermag counterparts and millions of people would just rather have a freedom arms rather than a dan wesson supermag and this would help in people deciding why should i buy one when i can match those ballistics in a freedom arms model 83?

  • 4140

    it would help against losing popularity to the freedom arms 83 in there strong 17-4ph revolvers otherwise day-zha-veiw will happen again when they lost to the competing freedom arms in the late 80s plus they should make the 414 there next chambering and not the 357 or 375 supermag at least not before a 414 this time. at least twice now the 414 has been the last to come along just like the 41 magnum and when i heard the supermags would be back this year i was at least hoping the 414 would be introduced at the same time along with the 445 and not last again

  • 4140

    make the 414 the next supermag to be introduced and please dont make it last this time if we survive this december 21, 2012 apocalypse then we may very well be into another great depression maybe worse than any weve ever had either in 1929 or 2008. so if they start making 414 right now, then you should have plenty of time to get a good amount made and marketed before cz falls on hard times like all the other owners then at least the 414 hopefully will be a firm solid caliber even if czusa is still in buisness but after so many years we still have to see it to beleive it to see if the supermags are finally here to say or will be short lived again

  • HBR

    I owned a new Dan Wesson stainless 44 mag, I think it was in the 70's. The cylinder bolt broke. Sent it back and they installed a 41 mag cylinder by mistake. Sent it back and they repaired it, Shot a box or so and the rear sight came apart. The front sight was also came loose. I was very frustrated. I took it to a gunsmith and he repaired the sights. I wrote a letter to the factory and a week later I recieved a call from the plant manager. He was very apologetic. He said they had problems with their stainless steel product. I guess everyone gets a lemon once in a while. The gun was accurate but after all the problems I kept wondering what next! I traded it on a Ruger Super Redhawk and was very pleaased with the Ruger. I suppose they now have a much better gun than I had purchase years ago. I also bought a Ruger stainless Blackhawk a few years ago and the workmanship was pretty shoddy no where close to the Super Redhawk.

  • jeff penningdon

    i think cz/dan wesson would do well to make rifles in all there supermag calibers except the 375 supermag because its tapered if there going to have a 375 handgun cartridge it should be a new case perfectly straight like the others i'd like to see them offered in a stong bolt action but also in a slide action slide actions or pump rifles i think are the best and fastest handling of all rifles which should be more popular faster than a lever action but can't snag as easily in brush and snag twigs faster loading keeping the gun straight while chambering another round i too am a 41 caliber fan and would hate to see the 414 left out

  • Bill Mariano

    I had all the super mags except the 414 i couldn't find one.I also had a couple B.F.R.'s i now own a Freedom arms i feel the DW and B.F.R. are the best buys and can out shoot the F.A.which is over priced in my opinion.I think D.W. should come out with at least one new chambering like maby a 308 sup.mag, an elongated 30 carbine for varmints.

  • tim jones

    i don't think they would do that when it would make more sense for a 32 caliber supermag instead so one could also shoot the 32 s&w, 32 h&r magnum, and 327 federal magnum as well and why not just have a tc contender/encore in 30-30 or 308 winchester instead? or a magnum research bfr in 30-30? anyway, if they did have a supermag in a 308 diameter, then there could never be a 32 caliber supermag as the two are to close in diameter to make it worth it, 308 vs 312, and most people would rather it be a 32 supermag for those reasons then, i' like to see them come out with a 450 supermag, only have it be a rimmed case instead of the rimless one they were working on before they sold to cz-usa and also come out with a 475 supermag because there is quite a space between 45 and 50 caliber, except the 480 ruger and 475 linebaugh which are not elongated, and though they are powerful, neither one is near as powerful as a 475 supermag would be, but the 450 supermag should not be offered in the lighter than 72 ounce version since it,d be much more powerful than the 445 and the 475 suoermag shoud weigh about 76 ounces with since it would be close inpower to the 500 smith&wesson magnum

  • ed p.

    maybe they should just make a revolver for the 475 linebaugh maximum and call it that instead of 475 supermag as they would both be the same exact cartridge anyway same goes fo the 500 linebaugh maximum and 505 supermag. the 610 supermag would be illegal as the law says, no handgun may be over 50 caliber and look how large the 500 s&w, magnum research, and century 100 in 50-70, guns are, and realize how huge a 60 caliber supermag would be! at would require a new larger revolver probably weighing 7 or 8 pounds maybe it would be legal as a rifle cartridge? i've got an idea for my own wildcat caliber by having a dan wesson 414 or 445 rebored to 45 caliber for a 45 caliber supermag you could by smith&wesson 460 cases and cut them down to 1.610 lenght the exact supermag length for my 455 supermag

    • jp wilson

      CZ should bring out a 8" or 10" full lug vent heavy wheelgun in .22 mag, this would blow the S/W# 617 out of the water. Remember, there's not a woman in Atlanta that wount tell that Ric Flair isn't a sixty minute man. WOOOOOOO!!!!!.

  • Rex

    I have looked at the CZUSA web site and they are not showing any DW revolvers; only the 1911 models. There is no mention of them being re-introduced anywhere in the site. About 6 weeks ago I sent an email asking for some clarification as to the availability of the revolvers again and as yet have not received a reply. I would REALLY like to see the revolvers make a comeback!

  • rich

    Are they going to offer pistol packs? I had one and sold it, to my regret

  • john c.

    bob serva should have sold the company to another like ruger, s&w, or taurus or at least the blueprints and machinery for the supermag revolvers instead of cz-usa.it's obvious cz-usa was never into revolvers even before they aquired dan wesson, every time they're asked about the supermags, they don't have the time.i think it's time other manufacters to finally make us some good revolvers in these supermag chamberings. i think if ruger,s&w,or taurus received enough requests to make revolvers in these calibers,they'd do it.the only reason they haven't yet, is because they think they would'nt sell enough. so all of you supermag fans out there,if you wish the other revolver companys would make guns in these calibers,start writing,and giving e-mails to the other revolver makers. if they get like, millions of requests from customers asking to make them, then they'd certainly do it. they just need to know that there are enough people who'd want them. please! we want some revolvers for them! in all the original calibers too!

  • john c.

    bob serva should have sold the company to another who was commited to the revolvers and the supermags. it's obvious that cz-usa was never into revolvers even before they aquired dan wesson. every time they're asked about the supermags, they dont have time. i think if ruger,s&w,or taurus received enough requests to make revolvers in the supermag chamberings,they'd do it. the only reason they haven't yet,is because they think they would'nt sell enough. so all of you supermag fans out there,if you wish others would finally make us some good revolvers in these calibers, start writing and giving e-mails to ruger,taurus,smith and wesson and magnum research.if they get like, millions of requests from customers asking to make some guns in these chamberings, they'd certainly do it. they just need to know that there are enough people who'd want them. please! we want some revolvers for them! in all the original calibers too!

  • john c.

    sorry about that. did'nt mean to leave two identical comments. by the time i realized my mistake, it was too late. i tried to remove the first one, but found it impossible.

  • john c.

    sorry about that. i did'nt mean to leave two identical comments. i did'nt think it took the first time. by the time i realized my mistake, it was too late. i tried to remove the first one, and found it impossible.

  • carl bucklin

    i wish cz would make a revolver in 22 hornet but 40 ounces or less like a varmint revolver should be. the ballistics of a .22 magnum rifle in a lightweight revolver, but reloadability and with interchangeable barrels.

  • tom

    i'd like to see them make a moon clip revolver for 45 winchester magnum/460 roland/45 acp all in one, and possibly a seperate cylinder fof 45 colt. it would be perfect for pesky wild hogs and just in case we ever have zombies or werewolves too.

  • dan

    hi,,, to whom it may consurne,,, i'm looking for parts for my dan wesson,, large frame… can some one help me,,,,,,,:(

    • Jim

      Call the Norwich, NY CZ office they had a ton of parts for Dan Wesson's but they also just had a fire last year. 607-336-1174 or 607-336-2712

  • randy

    you'd have better luck looking at some of the gun shows or internet. might find someone willing to do a trade. never know what you might find there.

  • randy

    i just looked and ebay has both dan wesson revolvers and parts for sale.

  • Dean

    I have a Dan and Wesson 44 450 Magnum. I purchased new in 2006. It came with a 3" inch prototype barrel with two stock barrels I believe a 6" and 8" I will have to check it has been locked up in the gun cabinet. It is in very good shape. My question is has any one heard of a 3" prototype barrel? It has Dan and Wesson's markings. I'm told this never went into production. Any comments would be appreciated.

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