Skip to main content

The Hi-Point 30 Super Carry: Best Hi-Point Carbine Yet?

Hi-Point has a an extensive line of pistol-caliber carbines, but the new Model 3095TS in .30 Super Carry could be the best one yet.

The Hi-Point 30 Super Carry: Best Hi-Point Carbine Yet?

HiPoint's newest PCC in 30 Super Carry is the first of its kind. 

Affiliate Disclosure: This page contains affiliate links. We earn from qualifying purchases.

In the world of pistol-caliber carbines, Hi-Point is the first company to chamber a carbine in the new .30 Super Carry (.30 SC) cartridge. The Model 3095TS joins Hi-Point’s affordable carbine lineup of other caliber offerings like .380 Auto, 9mm, .40 S&W, 10mm, and .45 ACP that are all priced starting around $350. Are they any good? Ask your local gun dealer. Odds are they sell a bunch to satisfied customers. Successful companies know their customers; Hi-Point is an excellent example of this adage. They are an American manufacturer of what they call “the working man’s gun.” Family-owned in Mansfield, Ohio, Hi-Point concentrates on utility and value over what might be trendy or dripping with all the bells and whistles. You may know them for their popular C9 9mm pistols. Hi-Point products have been an extremely affordable option for over 30 years.

The Hi-Point Model 3095TS

hi-point-30-super-carry-carbine-06
The Hi-Point 30 Super Carry Carbine is easy to disassemble.

This is the world’s first production .30 SC carbine. Like their other carbine offerings, the 3095TS has a 16.5-inch barrel, is blowback operated, measures just 31 inches, and weighs 6.25 pounds. At first glance, it has a modern, no-nonsense look to it. It’s also 100-percent American-made. The skeletonized polymer stock is built like a tank. To keep it light and strong, it is molded in two halves and then bolted together, allowing for strategic cavities throughout. The integral, spring-loaded butt pad requires around 55 pounds to fully compress. The stock also has rails on the 6 o’clock position for a bipod, forward grip, or weaponlight. The 16.5-inch steel barrel is rifled using a 1:12-inch twist. The muzzle is threaded 1/2x28 for your favorite 9mm suppressor or muzzle device. A low-profile thread protector is included to keep everything clean and free of damage. The steel front sight post has a simple shrouded front blade that is adjustable vertically by loosening a retaining screw with the provided Dual LOK wrench. The adjustable rear sight features a crisp 1.5mm peep in a recessed plate to reduce glare. There are also elevation and windage adjustment reference tick marks for precise movement. The rear sight assembly is completely removable to make space for larger optics if preferred.

hi-point-30-super-carry-carbine-03
Hi-Point joins two molded halves together, allowing for strategic cavities throughout that bring overall weight down.

The two-position selector is easy to operate from any shooting position. Up is Safe, down is Fire. The 6.5-pound trigger is nicely contoured to provide a smooth pull from the integral grip. It takes a bit to get used to but seems to break reasonably well in the same spot. Reset on the trigger is smooth with a subtle click about halfway forward. The bolt holds back on the last round allowing for quick mag changes. You can also lock the bolt rearward by pulling back on the charging handle and then manually pushing it into a slot on the shroud. It’s a simple and smart design. The steel magazine is the same single-stack style found in Hi-Point’s pistols and other carbines. Unfortunately, they are not interchangeable. The feed lips do a decent job positioning cartridges in proper alignment for chambering. I did have to give one of the lips a little bend to make it more reliable. Magazines are released by using a left-side thumb button that worked every time I used it. Disassembly is as easy as removing two pins, a retainer plate, and the charging handle. After that, the shroud and firing assembly can be removed and maintained.

Federal's .30 Super Carry

hi-point-30-super-carry-carbine-02
Though not many options are available in this relatively new cartridge, Federal produces a fine lineup that functions well in this carbine.

Released in 2022 by Federal, it was designed primarily for the concealed-carry and law enforcement community. The .30 Super Carry (SC) is the cartridge that bridges the gap between .380 Auto and 9mm, with ballistics closer to 9mm. It’s roughly the same length as a 9mm but 1mm smaller in diameter. A traditional 10-round 9mm magazine can usually manage a dozen .30 SC cartridges. Having more rounds per magazine is a good thing. Available in projectile weights between 100 and 115 grains, there are plenty of options for those transitioning from 9mm. The Hi-Point 3095TS is rated for +P, so it can accept any factory-made .30 SC produced today. Unfortunately, since the 3095TS uses single-stack magazines, they are still only limited to 10 rounds for now. There is a 20-round extended magazine for the 9mm but nothing yet for .30 SC. There is still an advantage to users who already have a pistol chambered in .30 SC, as they can use the same ammo stockpile. Either way, options are a great thing, especially if you’re looking to be the first kid on the block with the new hotness.

hi-point-30-super-carry-carbine-05
A size comparison of .30 Super Carry (middle) alongside its neighbors: the .380 Auto (left) and 9mm (right).

I was pleasantly surprised at the accuracy and shootability. I set up on the 50-yard lane with a bipod and hefty rear sandbag. I opted to test with the iron sights. The adjustments were easy to make, and the rear peep and front sight post offered a nice sight picture with a good cheekrest height. The rifle was easy to shoulder and had a comfortable grip. I locked the bolt back on an empty mag, removed it, and loaded it with 5 rounds of Federal American Eagle to see if I was on paper. When pulling back on the charging handle, there isn’t any measurable overtravel. It simply unlocks and is already in position to pick up the first round, just about touching the cartridge. Let go of the charging handle and allow the mass of the bolt to do its job. Once chambered, the system ran smooth with little muzzle rise. The trigger broke predicably at 6.5 pounds and reset smoothly. The 10-round mags were easy to load up to the final round. It’s snug, but it gets in there and fed fine. It was fun and definitely one of those guns that you want to plink with all day.

Hi-Point Range Results

hi-point-30-super-carry-carbine-04
The magazine inserts through the grip, much like a standard handgun.

I tested three different types of .30 SC: American Eagle, Gold Dot, and Blazer. All gave me surprisingly accurate results. At 50 yards, the 100-grain American Eagle grouped .62 inches at an average velocity of 1,478 fps. The 115-grain Gold Dot grouped 5 rounds at .92 inches with an average muzzle velocity of 1,241 fps. The 115-grain CCI Blazer grouped 1.01 inches with an average velocity of 1,286 fps. To say the least, I was impressed. Folks at the range took notice as well. I feel the need to mention a few things I didn’t care for. The magazine release works well right-handed, but when shooting left-handed, I often pressed the magazine release as I squeezed the trigger, dropping the magazine. Perhaps Hi-Point could make a reversable release button. The other thing was the triggerguard. While it’s sleek looking, there’s not enough room to safely operate the trigger with a gloved hand. Some of us shooters need gloves for those colder months of the plinking season. It’s worth mentioning that Hi-Point backs their products with a warranty that covers repairs for the life of the firearm, regardless of who owned it before you. You might be the fifth owner, and they’ll still fix it if it breaks. That’s a big added value right there. Overall, I’d recommend the Hi-Point Carbine to anyone interested. I can’t honestly think of a better value on the market. If you’re on a budget, consider Hi-Point. You get a lot of bang for your buck.

hi-point-30-super-carry-carbine-07
The cheekrest height is just right and offers a nice sight picture.

Hi-Point Model 3095TS Specs

  • Type: Blowback-operated, carbine
  • Cartridge: .30 Super Carry
  • Capacity: 10+1 rds. 
  • Overall Length: 16.5 in. 
  • Weight: 6.25 lbs. 
  • Stock: Black polymer with integral grip
  • Length of Pull: 14.5 in. 
  • Finish: Powder coat
  • Sights: Adjustable ghost ring rear, front post
  • Safety: two-position selector
  • MSRP: $369
  • Manufacturer: Hi-Point

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Recommended Articles

Recent Videos

Mikey Hartman, Lt. Col. (Ret.) of Israeli Defense Forces, joins David Fortier for an exclusive interview for Shotgun News.
Guns

Browning X-Bolt Mountain Pro

Mikey Hartman, Lt. Col. (Ret.) of Israeli Defense Forces, joins David Fortier for an exclusive interview for Shotgun News.
Guns

Taurus TX 22 Competition

Mikey Hartman, Lt. Col. (Ret.) of Israeli Defense Forces, joins David Fortier for an exclusive interview for Shotgun News.
Gear

Federal FireStick Precharged Loads

Mikey Hartman, Lt. Col. (Ret.) of Israeli Defense Forces, joins David Fortier for an exclusive interview for Shotgun News.
Gear

Remington Core-Lokt Tipped

Mikey Hartman, Lt. Col. (Ret.) of Israeli Defense Forces, joins David Fortier for an exclusive interview for Shotgun News.
Guns

Walther PDP

Mikey Hartman, Lt. Col. (Ret.) of Israeli Defense Forces, joins David Fortier for an exclusive interview for Shotgun News.
Learn

Hodgdon Shooting Powder

Mikey Hartman, Lt. Col. (Ret.) of Israeli Defense Forces, joins David Fortier for an exclusive interview for Shotgun News.
News

A World Record Attempt: Practice Round and Media Day

Mikey Hartman, Lt. Col. (Ret.) of Israeli Defense Forces, joins David Fortier for an exclusive interview for Shotgun News.
Learn

How to Aim with Iron Sights

Mikey Hartman, Lt. Col. (Ret.) of Israeli Defense Forces, joins David Fortier for an exclusive interview for Shotgun News.
Guns

Custom Mossberg 500 at the Range and Live Turkey!?

Mikey Hartman, Lt. Col. (Ret.) of Israeli Defense Forces, joins David Fortier for an exclusive interview for Shotgun News.
Learn

SHOOT 101: Know Your Handgun Types

Mikey Hartman, Lt. Col. (Ret.) of Israeli Defense Forces, joins David Fortier for an exclusive interview for Shotgun News.
News

Interview with Israeli Defense Forces, Part 1

Shooting Times Magazine Covers Print and Tablet Versions

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Digital Now Included!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

Buy Digital Single Issues

Magazine App Logo

Don't miss an issue.
Buy single digital issue for your phone or tablet.

Buy Single Digital Issue on the Shooting Times App

Other Magazines

See All Other Magazines

Special Interest Magazines

See All Special Interest Magazines

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Shooting Times stories delivered right to your inbox.

Phone Icon

Get Digital Access.

All Shooting Times subscribers now have digital access to their magazine content. This means you have the option to read your magazine on most popular phones and tablets.

To get started, click the link below to visit mymagnow.com and learn how to access your digital magazine.

Get Digital Access

Not a Subscriber?
Subscribe Now

Enjoying What You're Reading?

Get a Full Year
of Guns & Ammo
& Digital Access.

Offer only for new subscribers.

Subscribe Now