Skip to main content

The Hi-Standard Model-GE

The Hi-Standard Model-GE
The Hi-Standard Model-GE earned a fine reputation for high-quality craftsmanship and extreme accuracy. One of its favorite features is the ease with which barrels can be removed and cleaned or switched via the thumb latch in the forward upper end of the trigger guard.
Built in 1950, the Model-GE pistol shown was one of Hi-Standard’s premium, top-of-the-line target pistols. Only about 2,900 were made, all in the company’s New Haven, Connecticut, plant during 1949 and ’50. Several premium features endeared these pistols to the target crowd. Triggers were crisp and adjustable. The thumb safety and grip angle were similar to those of the venerable Model 1911, although the grip angle was steeper than the 1911’s. The GE’s grip had a comfortable thumbrest and was handcheckered. The barrel could be removed in seconds, enabling easy cleaning from the chamber end as well as quick swapping of different-length barrels.

Three configurations were offered: the Model-GE with a 4.5-inch barrel; the Model-GE with a 6.75-inch barrel (like the version shown); and the Model-GE as a two-barrel set. With a well-earned reputation for superb accuracy and easy shootability, the Model-GE became one of Hi-Standard’s more coveted pistols.

Mechanicals

The slide stop is located on the right side of the Model-GE and is mortised deeply into the upper edge of the right grip panel, making it somewhat difficult to access and activate manually. However, the slide locks open on an empty magazine, and “slingshotting” the slide to chamber a round rather than pressing the slide stop to release it probably benefits reliability by giving the slide a running start before picking up the rim of the fresh cartridge.

The manual thumb safety resides at the left rear of the slide. It’s cleanly contoured and nicely serrated, providing a perfect combination of low-snag profile and positive function. When engaged, it locks the slide.

The trigger guard and backstrap are deeply undercut, promoting a very high grip. The frontstrap is flared forward at the lower end, which helps seat the hand properly and protects the forward lip of the magazine baseplate.

//content.osgnetworks.tv/shootingtimes/content/photos/HiStandardModelGe1.jpg
The barrel is removed for cleaning or swapping by retracting the slide, pushing up on the thumb latch, and sliding the barrel off the frame. It will slide about 1.5 inches in its tightly fitted dovetail before coming free.

Not being made for fast reloads, the Model-GE’s magazine well is crisp-cornered, and magazines fit with superbly tight, smooth tolerances, sliding home like the precision part they are. The mag catch is located in the bottom of the grip. If the catch is pressed and held, empty magazines drop free; if pressed and released, the magazine partially ejects and is then held by spring tension for manual removal.

A compact, triangular-shaped latch in the forward top of the trigger guard secures the quick-detach barrel. Press it upward and draw the barrel firmly forward. It will slide about an inch and a half in its tightly fitted dovetail before coming free.

Measured with my Lyman digital trigger gauge, the crisp, clean trigger breaks at 2 pounds, 10 ounces with less than 0.7 ounce of variation over a series of measurements.

Provenance

A good friend loaned me the pristine Model-GE reviewed here. His father put it up as the prize for an all-day family shooting competition, and my buddy posted top scores and walked away with the pistol.

//content.osgnetworks.tv/shootingtimes/content/photos/HiStandardModelGe2.jpg

Little is known of the history of the pistol prior to coming to my friend’s family, aside from the fact that it was clearly somebody’s pride and joy. Very few 68-year-old firearms look as new as this one.

Rangetime

Because of the Hi-Standard pistol’s target-world pedigree, I picked test ammo selectively, digging up Eley Subsonic Hollowpoints, CCI Select LRNs, Browning BPR HPs, and Federal Gold Medal Solids.

Sandbagging the pistol rather than attempting to test accuracy offhand, Bullseye style, I fired a series of five-shot groups with each type of ammunition from 50 feet. Courtesy of the long sight radius and crisp post front, it was easy to shoot consistent groups, and the Davis adjustable rear sight made putting those groups center-target easy.

//content.osgnetworks.tv/shootingtimes/content/photos/HiStandardModelGe3.jpg

This Hi-Standard Model-GE is the single most accurate vintage pistol I’ve ever tested. The wind was gusting to 20 mph, making the cardboard target sway, and the partly overcast light kept abruptly shifting from glaring sunlight to drab shadow, but two of the four loads tested produced five-shot groups that averaged about a half-inch at 50 feet. I have no doubt that in a Ransom Rest the pistol would average a quarter-inch or less at that distance with the ammo it prefers.

In addition to the inherent accuracy, with its fantastic trigger pull, the Model-GE is extremely easy to shoot and offers clean, crisp sights and a very comfortable, consistent grip. 

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Recommended Articles

See More Recommendations

Popular Videos

The Glock 21

The Glock 21

Frank and Tony from Gallery of Guns spice up the Glock test using their non-dominant hands.

Hornady 6MM Creedmoor

Hornady 6MM Creedmoor

Tom Beckstrand and Neal Emery of Hornady highlight the 6MM Creedmoor ammo.

Tactical Solutions Introduces New X-Ring Takedown SBR Rifle

Tactical Solutions Introduces New X-Ring Takedown SBR Rifle

Keith Feeley of Tactical Solutions sat down with Michael Bane at SHOT Show 2018 to talk about the new X-Ring Takedown SBR .22LR rifle.

Skills Drills: 3-Second Headshot

Skills Drills: 3-Second Headshot

James Tarr runs through the 3-Second Headshot drill.

See More Popular Videos

Trending Articles

Improved bullet ballistic coefficients lead to greater performance and accuracy downrange without upping blast and recoil. Here's why.Improved Ballistics a Key to Accurate Long-Range Shooting How-To

Improved Ballistics a Key to Accurate Long-Range Shooting

Rick Jamison

Improved bullet ballistic coefficients lead to greater performance and accuracy downrange...

The Rossi RB22M .22 WMR bolt-action rifle features a synthetic stock, a crossbolt safety, and a detachable five-round magazine. The rifle comes with scope mount bases installed.Rossi RB22M .22 WMR Rifle Review Rifles

Rossi RB22M .22 WMR Rifle Review

Joel J. Hutchcroft - July 10, 2020

The Rossi RB22M .22 WMR bolt-action rifle features a synthetic stock, a crossbolt safety, and...

Like situational ethics, standards of accuracy vary according to circumstances.Accuracy: It's All Relative How-To

Accuracy: It's All Relative

Terry Wieland - May 09, 2019

Like situational ethics, standards of accuracy vary according to circumstances.

The heart of the newest Model 70 is, of course, its action.Winchester Model 70 Extreme Weather SS Review Rifles

Winchester Model 70 Extreme Weather SS Review

Greg Rodriguez - September 23, 2010

The heart of the newest Model 70 is, of course, its action.

See More Trending Articles

More Handguns

We like the name of the new Taurus handgun-hunting revolver. It's called the Raging Hunter. We like the way the revolver handles and shoots, too.Taurus Raging Hunter Review Handguns

Taurus Raging Hunter Review

Joel J. Hutchcroft - April 08, 2020

We like the name of the new Taurus handgun-hunting revolver. It's called the Raging Hunter. We...

The Springfield Hellcat is also available in the OSP (Optical Sight Pistol) version, which has the same open sights as the standard model but a 0.190-inch-deep mortise machined into the top of the slide is a snug fit for a micro red-dot sight. It comes with a removable steel plate that fills the mortise, giving the user the option of using the gun with or without a red-dot sight. Embedding the optic allows the open sights to be viewed without having to make them uncommonly tall.Springfield Hellcat OSP Review Handguns

Springfield Hellcat OSP Review

Layne Simpson - June 18, 2020

The Springfield Hellcat is also available in the OSP (Optical Sight Pistol) version, which has...

The Smith & Wesson Model 57 N-Frame .41 Magnum—a favorite of sixgun superstars—refuses to go out of style.Smith & Wesson Model 57 N-Frame .41 Magnum Review Handguns

Smith & Wesson Model 57 N-Frame .41 Magnum Review

Payton Miller - May 20, 2020

The Smith & Wesson Model 57 N-Frame .41 Magnum—a favorite of sixgun superstars—refuses to go...

The painful part about Brian Lohman Manufacturing's new YMIR Model 1911 is that it carries a retail price of $6,999. Not many of us can afford to pay that much for a pistol, but if you think of this gun as being a piece of art, one that you can actually use and then pass down to an heir, then maybe the sting of its price is tolerable.Lohman YMIR 1911 Review Handguns

Lohman YMIR 1911 Review

Joel J. Hutchcroft - June 16, 2020

The painful part about Brian Lohman Manufacturing's new YMIR Model 1911 is that it carries a...

See More Handguns

Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Digital Now Included!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE Arrow

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Phone Icon

Get Digital Access.

All Shooting Times subscribers now have digital access to their magazine content. This means you have the option to read your magazine on most popular phones and tablets.

To get started, click the link below to visit mymagnow.com and learn how to access your digital magazine.

Get Digital Access

Not a Subscriber?
Subscribe Now